Opera GX also joins the Microsoft Store


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We have already spoken about Opera GX several times, and personally I think a most intelligent and well thought out proposal. And it is that designing a web browser aimed in particular at the gaming community, with multiple functions and integrations of elements of this world, and also added to an aesthetic design very in accordance with the canons of this world, can arouse the interest of many users whom they had never heard of Opera, and thus were hitherto beyond their reach.

One of the strengths of Opera GX is probably the integration of third-party services in its sidebar, which greatly facilitates the simultaneous use of two or more of them. For example, for some time now it has become quite common to use Twitch and Discord at the same time, which under normal conditions requires having two windows open (each with one of the services) and constantly “jumping” from there. ‘to one another. other. to another. Realizing this, Opera GX makers have integrated Discord into the browser, avoiding this need.

Opera GX, however, has the same problem as its big brother, Opera, and that is that these are browsers that they love, they love a lot, but despite this, and for decades, they failed to climb positions in the ranking of the most used. I remember having conversations about this about 20 years ago, and the situation has hardly changed, no matter how much the makers have done the unspeakable to create an innovative and reliable browser (it was the first to have tabs, to give just one example). .

With the release of Windows 11, Microsoft focused on its app store, Microsoft Store, a repository that, let’s face it, has never had a lot of support from the developer community, nor has it generated a lot of interest from users. Those at Redmond seem determined to turn this around and, therefore, are making multiple changes that, if working properly, could help in this regard.

A key point concerns web browsers, and that is that so far the company established limitations regarding the engine they had to use to be accessible from the store. This is no longer the case and with this change came a few weeks ago a first and striking news in this regard, the landing of Firefox in the Microsoft Store, something that until recently was unimaginable. And now Opera and Opera GX have been added, which, as we can read in Softpedia, can be downloaded and installed on Windows, 10 and 11, through the Microsoft Store.

Opera GX also joins the Microsoft Store

When the availability of Firefox was announced in the Microsoft Store, there was an interesting debate which, surely, will be reproduced when talking about Opera GX, What do browsers gain by joining the Windows Store? This is a substantive question, which is worth giving a few turns.

First of all, we must remember that there are many systems in which, either by the version of Windows, or by the security policies defined therein, software can only be installed from Microsoft Store. We’re not talking about massive numbers of users, but probably enough for Firefox, Opera, and Opera GX to do what they can to become accessible to those users.

On the other hand, as I mentioned earlier, those in Redmond are focusing on their app store, which will probably cause more users to access it. In other words, the Microsoft Store is a storefront that until now had a very limited size, but could expand in the short and medium term, giving more visibility to the software available there. Opera and Opera GX, which have a significant visibility problem, could benefit greatly from this possible change.

But here not only Opera GX and other browsers win, of course. For its part, Microsoft Store needs to develop its catalog with attractive software which is of more interest to users in the platform. Adding apps that have a lot of prestige, such as Firefox and Opera, is undoubtedly a very smart move in this regard. And it doesn’t help much to have a store with an exceptional location, if then what you sell there isn’t interesting to all the people who pass by, right?


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